Home My Account My Cart
Cart
item(s)

Currencies:

Search:

 
 
  Top » Catalog » FAQ » Questions and Answers Log In |  Cart Contents  |  Checkout | 
Translate This Page to Your Language
Questions and Answers

Questions and Answers

  1. How do I check my Battery Voltage?

  2. How do I test the Ignition (HT) Coil?

     

  3. How can I determine how many amps my charging system is drawling?

  4. What are the Differences in modern regulator rectifiers?

  5. How can I test out my stator?

  6. How do I test my regulator rectifier?

     

  7. How can a Stator fail?

  8. How to test your System Voltage?


  1. How do I check my Battery Voltage?


    Electronic Control Unit (ECU) failure is commonly caused by a damaged regulator. The regulator transforms AC current from the generator into a DC current to load your battery. A faulty regulator will cause the ECU to receive a voltage supply that is out of its' normal range, which will cause the ECU to fail.

     

    How to Test the Regulator:

    1. Install the replacement ECU

    2. Start the engine, but DO NOT rev it up, let the engine run idle

    3. Measure the battery's voltage, a normal reading will be approximately 14 volts

    4. Slowly rev up the engine, while keeping a constant eye on the battery voltage. The battery voltage should stay below 15 volts

    5. If your voltage reads beyone 15 volts, stop the test immediately, a new regulator is needed.



    [Back To Top]

  2. How do I test the Ignition (HT) Coil?

     


    OEM electronic control units (ECUs) are commonly damaged by worn out or defective ignition coils. Although a HT coil may still spark, if the inner coils are damaged, they will continue to accept more current than the ECU can handle. This will lead to the breakdown of the electronic control unit.

    How to Check the Igntion Coil: 

    1. Unplug both plugs on the ignition coil

    2. Measure the resistance of the two terminals. A normal reading will be between 3 and 4.3

    3. If the resistance between the two terminals is lower, then your igntion coil needs to be replaced.

     

    *Only install the replacement ECU once you are positive the ignition coils are good.



    [Back To Top]

  3. How can I determine how many amps my charging system is drawling?


    1. Disconnect your charging system. Put a battery charger on the battery to keep system voltage constant.

    2. Use a clamp on inductive amp meter on battery negative cable.

    3. Start engine. and turn on all normal electrical accessories. Read amp meter. Add 2 amps for battery draw. This is consider normal usage.

    4. Turn on all accessories. Read meter. Add 2 amps for battery draw. This is maximum usage.

    Please keep in mind: Amperage usage should be at least 2 amps lower then charging system output.



    [Back To Top]

  4. What are the Differences in modern regulator rectifiers?


    Aftermarket regulator rectifiers are not always identical to your oem regulator rectifier. There could be a difference in the amount of wires and or colors of the wires. After installing a new aftermarket regulator rectifier, and charging issues continue to persist, then you should try using the flow chart that we provide through our FAQ page. 



    [Back To Top]

  5. How can I test out my stator?


    The simplest stator test would be to test the stator output at 5k RPMS.

    At 5k RPMS your stator should be putting out between 50 -75 Volts* through each lead Combination.

    Label each stator lead (3 wires, generally yellow) A, B, C respectively.

    Test Wire combinations

    A> B

    B> C

    A >C


    If your stator is good, then you will see the same with each of the tests above.


    When stator the stator with the engine off is to check continuity between all three legs, readlings should be farly consistent.  There should be NO continuity to ground(any three wires to engine case).


    *VAC ( Volts AC Current)




    [Back To Top]

  6. How do I test my regulator rectifier?

     


    You can test a regulator rectifier by performing a reverse bias test. 

    Label the input stator wires on the regulator A,B, and C

    Label the power and the negative wire on the regulator rectifier D, and E respectively.

    Just use an ohm-meter, and connect the ohmmeter to the ends of each of the diodes and check the resistance in both directions. The resistance should be low in one direction and very high in the opposite direction. The exact specs are usually given in most shop manuals. A general guideline for testing most diodes is to have 5 - 40 ohms of resistance in the forward bias direction (where the current is allowed to flow), and infinite resistance in the reverse bias direction (where the current isn't allowed to flow).

    Testing the rectifier involves attaching the black probe of the meter to the ground side of the rectifier(E) and the red probe of the meter to each of the three contacts ( A, B, C) . Record the numbers. Then swap around the meter leads (red and black are swapped) and take the readings again. You have thus measured the ground side of the regulator rectifier.

    Testing the battery side( D)  of the rectifier involves attaching the meter probes to the battery side of the rectifier and testing the doides in the same way as just described. Once that is done, you should have about twelve readings that are the forward and reverse bias measurements for each of the doides.

    Installation Precautions:

    * Do NOT disconnect the voltage regulator output (the red wires), the regulator harness or the battery cables while the engine is running.

    * Always remove the negative battery cable before operating on the charging system.  

    *During battery installation, confirm that the negative battery cable is connected to the negative battery terminal.  

    *While charging the battery, confirm that the negative battery cable is connected to the negative battery terminal (this helps avoid charging the battery backwards)



    [Back To Top]

  7. How can a Stator fail?


     

    Stators are fairly simple and their problems fall in to two categories: shorts and opens. Shorts can be from winding to winding or from winding to ground AKA "Short to Ground".

    a) Winding to winding shorts are tested with a AC volt meter from pin to pin on stator plug with the motor running. Check service manual for proper voltage specs at given rpm. The best way to test for shorts to ground is with a 12 volt test light.Check from each stator pin to ground. If the light lights the stator is bad, there should not be any continuity from either stator pin to ground. Sometimes an ohms meter will not pick up a short to ground. The light test is the perferred testing instrument. Then Measure AC amps between stator and regulator.

     

    b) Open stators have no AC voltage output. The Shunt drop regulators draw full AC amps all the time and no e

     

    Stators are fairly simple and their problems fall in to two categories: shorts and opens. Shorts can be from winding to winding or from winding to ground AKA "Short to Ground".

    a) Winding to winding shorts are tested with a AC volt meter from pin to pin on stator plug with the motor running. Check service manual for proper voltage specs at given rpm. The best way to test for shorts to ground is with a 12 volt test light.Check from each stator pin to ground. If the light lights the stator is bad, there should not be any continuity from either stator pin to ground. Sometimes an ohms meter will not pick up a short to ground. The light test is the perferred testing instrument. Then Measure AC amps between stator and regulator.

     

    b) Open stators have no AC voltage output. The Shunt drop regulators draw full AC amps all the time and no extra load is needed. Series pass regulators will be necessary to load the DC system to achieve full AC amps. Put a DC volt meter and extra loads across the battery. Add load until battery voltage drops below 13 volts with the motor above 2500 rpm. Read AC meter and compare to service manual specs. Low output indicates a stator or possibly a rotor problem. Rotor problems are rare in most motocycle with the exception on The late 1970s- early 1980s Honda CB line. It is alos possible  the magnets do get weak or become loose in some other varieties of motorcycles.

    xtra load is needed. Series pass regulators will be necessary to load the DC system to achieve full AC amps. Put a DC volt meter and extra loads across the battery. Add load until battery voltage drops below 13 volts with the motor above 2500 rpm. Read AC meter and compare to service manual specs. Low output indicates a stator or possibly a rotor problem. Rotor problems are rare in most motocycle with the exception on The late 1970s- early 1980s Honda CB line. It is alos possible  the magnets do get weak or become loose in some other varieties of motorcycles.



    [Back To Top]

  8. How to test your System Voltage?


    The easiest and fastest way to determine if the charging system is operating satisfactorily is with a digital volt meter. Connect the volt meter across the battery before starting the bike. A fully charged battery should read 12.7 volts at 72degrees F. Anything less indicates a battery that needs charging or has other problems. Start the bike and allow it to run at a high idle for a minute or two to recharge the battery after starting if electrical stator was used. Turn on accessories used in normal operation (not turn signals or horn). If you get between 13.8 and 14.8 VDC (depending on model) you can assume the charging system is keeping up (as long as there is not a intermittent problem).



    [Back To Top]

    

Copyright © 2014 Regulatorrectifier.com